TOGETHER, WE CAN!

Black Authors

Some truly amazing reading by all of theses talented writers. 

 

Click on the videos:

Be in the know!

Can Kids Change The World? | Black History Month For Kids

Maya Angelou’s “Hey Black Child,” recited by 3-yr old Pe’Tehn Raighn Kem

Well Hidden Figures❤️!

AMERICAN MASTERS

American Masters: How It Feels To Be Free

A documentary that tells the inspiring story of how six iconic African American women entertainers – Lena Horne, Abbey Lincoln, Nina Simone, Diahann Carroll, Cicely Tyson and Pam Grier – challenged an entertainment industry deeply complicit in perpetuating racist stereotypes, and transformed themselves and their audiences in the process.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY:

 

 

 

RECIPES:

28 Soulful Recipes to Cook to Celebrate Black History Month

HISTORY

Motivation For Black Women

Black Excellist: 25 Black Tech Pioneers

 

Black Movies

The Hidden Figures

The Hate You Give

I am Bolt

Queen of Katwe

Southside with you

Fences

Birth of a Nation

Moonlight

42

The Photograph

The Princess and the Frog

The Wiz

Blank Panther

 

Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

Historian, writer and activist

Today, we are highlighting Arturo Alfono Schomburg, who is most known for his work resulting today in the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture located on 135th Street in Harlem.  (This is a MUST visit for anyone interested in history!)  A fascinating historical figure, Schomburg was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico and dedicated his early years to the struggle for the independence of Puerto Rico and Cuba.  He came to New York City in the late 1800s and worked with the circle of Cuban and Puerto Rican revolutionaries, like the great José Martí and Máximo Gomez, who were based there at the time.  Later, influenced by figures like WEB Dubois and Alaine Locke, Schomburg began work collecting important artifacts from the African diaspora, which would later become the basis for the Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem.  Schomburg’s work would later influence important figures associated with the Harlem Renaissance, such as Langston Hughs and Claude McKay.
Please check out these two links (English):
As well as this one (Español):